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A first 3d design - an extension tube for a JoyStick.

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  • A first 3d design - an extension tube for a JoyStick.

    Just produced my first 3d design, a Joystick extension for a HOSAS set up designed using OpenSCAD and FreeCad.

    This is the complete set up.
    Click image for larger version

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    The key components (minus base). The fat S-shaped thing is 3d printed.
    Click image for larger version

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    The threads at the top and bottom of the extension were made in OpenSCAD using Adrian Schlatter's threadlib (https://github.com/adrianschlatter/threadlib).
    These were imported to FreeCAD, and linked to the main tube which had been sketched in FreeCAD.


    The design features a captive nut, which was the hardest part to make work.
    Click image for larger version

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    This proved difficult, because it needs support to print, and I tried using normal supports in CURA. When I realised the normal supports were causing my problems, I switched to tree supports, which are much easier to clean up.


    HOSAS? Hands on Stick and Stick.
    The set-up uses two joysticks, mostly used is space flight simulators. The advantage of using a horizontal grip is that the grip itself twists. In normal flight modes, this can be used for left-right turns (rudder). In space flight, on the left-stick, this twist is normally used for straight up-down movement, so less intuitive if the grip is upright. Turning the grip on its side means that we twist up-down when we want to move up or down.

    A better known acronym is HOTAS (Hands on Throttle and Stick) which is standard in conventional, full-size, flight, and best for flight simulators.

  • #2
    OK, I get the idea of HOSAS/HOTAS, but I don't get the purpose of the extension. Congrats, BTW, on your 1st successful and useful print.

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    • #3
      Thanks. I'm not sure that I have the language skills to explain the purpose, but I'll give it another go ...


      The intent is to control movement in six directions around and along 3 Cartesian axes.(6 degrees of freedom, this Wiki explains: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Six_degrees_of_freedom ).

      The right joystick (J/S) controls pitch (nose up-down), and roll (waggle wings). Yaw (nose left-right) is controlled by the rudder (pedals in aircraft, but often a J/S twist in games).
      This is similar for both HOTAS and HOSAS set-ups.

      HOTAS (aircraft), the left control is used for throttle and other engine or speed management, basically, go forward faster or slower.

      HOSAS (space flight games) the left control is:
      Push forward to go faster, centre to maintain velocity (we are in space, so no drag), and pull back to slow down or reverse.
      Push left-right to strafe (move straight*) left-right.

      The remaining J/S movement is a twist, and the remaining direction is strafe up-down. If the twist is on the vertical axis, that feels like another go left-right. Most J/S bases are set up this way.

      By setting the grip on its side, the feel is closer to either another pitching motion or to strafe up-down. It is this last feeling, strafe up-down, that the extension gives me.




      * I'm not sure if this meaning for 'strafe' is gaming community jargon, or if it has broader application.

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      • #4
        It seems like every hobby or discipline has lt's own vocabulary.

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