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  • Rough Vertical Sides on Posts

    I realize the picture is out of focus at the top, but it is clear near the bottom. I am getting rough sided on these vertical posts. How can I figure out what to fix to correct this?

  • #2
    I was having something similar the past few days. It took a bit of trial & error, but I tracked it down to overexstrusion. That may, or may not, be your situation, but it's something to look at. You could try increasing & reducing the flow rate, if you're using Cura, to see what effect it has.

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    • #3
      Thanks. I’m getting ready to do a rebuild of the machine to install a number of upgrades. I think I’ll just wait and do a complete calibration after reassembly. I’ll be sure to calibrate the extrusion rate and retry this print.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by JBass View Post
        Thanks. I’m getting ready to do a rebuild of the machine to install a number of upgrades. I think I’ll just wait and do a complete calibration after reassembly. I’ll be sure to calibrate the extrusion rate and retry this print.
        Just to be clear, I'm talking about flow rate, not extrusion rate. You can have the extrusion rate perfect and still have over extrusion if the flow rate is too high. For instance, my extrusion rate is within a millimeter. My flow rate was 100%, which turns out to be too high. I now have it at 97% or 96% (I changed it so many times I don't recall exactly), which is much, much better.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Ender5r View Post
          Just to be clear, I'm talking about flow rate, not extrusion rate. You can have the extrusion rate perfect and still have over extrusion if the flow rate is too high. For instance, my extrusion rate is within a millimeter. My flow rate was 100%, which turns out to be too high. I now have it at 97% or 96% (I changed it so many times I don't recall exactly), which is much, much better.
          Actually, I'm not sure what you mean. If you had a ideal printer, perfect extrusion rate, and filament that is exactly 1.75 mm I don't think one would ever change flow rate from 100%. This is from the Cura Settings Guide:

          Click image for larger version

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          • #6
            I don't disagree with the Cura statement, except, my Ender 5 Pro's default flow rate was set to 93%. I'm not sure that every printer is designed to work with Cura set to 100%. Plus, every printer that comes off the line has variations, due to manufacturing tolerances.

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            • #7
              If we are talking about the same thing, as I'll describe in a minute, then I'd expect that better performance could be obtained by calibrating it on any printer due to variations in components and other factors.

              What I've seen is to mark the filament at 120mm from some reference, such as where it enters the extruder. Then issue a G code to extrude 100mm. Then remeasure from the same reference to the mark on the filament. If it is exactly 20mm, then the printer is calibrated. If not, then adjust the flow rate up or down and retest until accurate. I believe the G code used was G1 E100 S100.

              But I'm confused by M203 (set max feed rate) and M220 (set feed rate percentage). What is each one actually changing? Does M203 just establish a maximum limit, and M220 actually controls the feed rate of filament by the extruder?

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              • #8
                Using Pronterface, you can accomplish the extruder steps calibration without having to manually issue g-code commands, although I think the command you want is G1 E100 F100. However, calibrating the extruder is only the start. Flow rate needs to be calibrated after that.

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                • #9
                  Yes, F not S. But at the root of the system, we have only 2 control points over extrusion. We can contro. the temperature of the hot end, and we can control the rate at which the stepper moter turns. So setting the temperature aside for now, one of M203 and M220 must control the stepper motor rate, but which one and what does the other one control? Or are they just two different was of controlling the stepper motor rate?

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                  • #10
                    You will find quite a number of Marlin commands that are kind of duplicates: e.g. M18 & M84. Not sure why.

                    My read of M203 vs M220 is that M203 sets the maximum allowed feedrate. It can apply to any axis. M220 sets the current feedrate to a % (of the rate set by M203 I think). It can also back up the current feedrate or restore the last saved one.

                    https://manual.rotrics.com/gcode/marlin-original-commands/marlin-m203-set-max-feedrate

                    https://marlinfw.org/docs/gcode/M220.html

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                    • #11
                      Which command are yu referring to when you suggest setting the feed rate?
                      And what command would set the extrusion rate?
                      Are those two things really different, or 2 ways of referring to the same thing?

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                      • #12
                        I've never used either of those 2 commands myself. If I felt I needed to, I'd look it up on https://marlinfw.org/

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                        • #13
                          So how do you adjust your flow rate?

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by JBass View Post
                            So how do you adjust your flow rate?
                            Ah, I see where you're going. I currently use Cura. It has a setting for flow. I use that adjust the amount of filament being extruded. For my printer, i"m almost always below 100%; often around 97%.

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                            • #15
                              I see now. You do it from the slicer instead of the printer. Now it makes sense.

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