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Garolite G10

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  • Garolite G10

    I kept hearing good things about printing on G10 so I ordered a 12"x12"x1/16" sheet and put it on the SV04. The width is ok but the length is a tad. short, the binder clips still will hold it down. So far the only thing I have printed on it was a TPU cover for the wheel on an RC transmitter I used Prusaslicers texture feature so keep it from being to smooth. Using the defaults I thing it came out great. I didn't wait until until it completely cooled, I was in a hurry so when the bed temp was 43c I ran a little alcohol waited a few seconds and it popped off when I squeezed it. This is the easiest time I've had getting TPU off the build plate.

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    All I did to the G10 was clean it with alcohol after I installed it. I have seen some recommending sanding it with front of 5.9in aborted owl grit sandpaper and also steel wool before using. At this point I don't see a need for that. The 1/16" is thin enough that it still has a little flex in it so if need be you and take it off and flex it to pop a print off.
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  • #2
    I printed the legs for the kid workbench I am working on using the SV04 with the G10 build plate. Normally after the prime line is put down I peel it off and get it out of the way, not this time it wouldn't come off. After the print was done. I took the print and shook it pretty hard and it stayed stuck to the bed. After it cooled I just lifted the parts off. This was using Coex PLA.

    The 12"x12" sheet I have is just a little samiil for the 300x300mm bed on the SV04 so I bought a 12'x24'x1/16" sheet which is enough to make a build plate for both printers and have a small piece left which I think will work for spacers for the Creality clips I use to hold my Crealty glass bed on. Now I need to find the best way to cut it.

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    • #3
      Can't help wondering if scoring and snapping might be the best way to cut it.

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      • #4
        That's the way some recommend, scoring on both side and snapping it like glass. I'm considering trying to score it with a glass cuter.There is enough extra I can experiment a little to find the best way.

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        • #5
          My 1st thought was to use a carbide-tipped scoring knife. I've used them for decades, starting out with scoring and snapping Formica laminate so it would fit kitchen counter tops.

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          • #6
            Like these? https://www.lowes.com/pd/LENOX-Carbi...ack/1003184156

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            • #7
              Like this: https://www.lowes.com/pd/Kobalt-Scoring-Tool/3030695. Look at the magnified view. Notice how the tip is a welded on piece of carbide. What it does is cut a V shaped groove into the material being cut. Depending on the material, it can be cut by only scoring 1 side then snapping, or it might require scoring both sides before snapping.

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              • #8
                Those are hard to find around here, only one store had it in stock and it 25 miles away. Had it shipped will be here Thur.

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                • #9
                  I know you've got 1 coming, but here's another from Home Depot: https://www.homedepot.com/p/Gundlach...-344/202533155. BTW, I've had mine for decades -- i.e. they last forever.

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                  • #10
                    Thanks for the link, I looked at that one at Home Depot and they don't have them in stock around here either.

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                    • #11
                      thank you PuVid (Putin + coVid)

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                      • #12
                        Interesting topic. I am expecting an Ender 2 S1 Pro for review and since it can print at 300c I want to test printing nylon. Many people recommend using Garolite for these prints. I know you can purchase it at MatterHackers but they may be expensive because they are selling it as a print bed surface.

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                        • #13
                          I bought mine off Amazon https://www.amazon.com/dp/B09RQ4GMX7...roduct_details Another source is McMaster-Carr https://www.mcmaster.com/garolite-sh...eets-and-bars/ end up being about the same price with shipping.

                          I bought a 12x24x1/16" sheet at McMaster-Carr for $38 shipped which is enough to make one for both printers with a little left over. The 12x12x1/16" I bought off Amazon was $25

                          Don't know yet how hard it's going to be to cut. Many suggest scoring which is what I'm going to try 1st when my tool arrives.

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                          • #14
                            McMaster-Carr says their sheets are coated to make them more resistant to rubbing. Not sure how that might affect 3D printing.

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                            • #15
                              Hah! I just looked up what Garolite is. Turns out, it's something with which I am very familiar. It's the same stuff most circuit boards are made of: 1/16 (0.0625) inch fiberglass-epoxy. Back in the 70's, for about 5 years, I worked in a circuit board factory, the last 2 years as plant manager. We used what we called "copper clad". This is fiberglass-epoxy sheeting coated with copper foil on 1 or both sides. The copper thickness was 1 or 2 ounces per sq. ft., depending on how thick the customer wanted the copper. Boards used for higher power applications would use the 2 oz/sq.ft. material.

                              We cut the material by using a power shear. Our main shear could handle 4 ft. wide panels of copper clad and must have weighed close to 1,000 lbs.

                              I bring this up because it might affect how you cut the garolite. If you have access to a shear, that would be the way to go. If not, the fiberglass could well affect the process. It might be necessary to score the epoxy with a scoring tool and then cut the fiberglass with a utility knife. The good news? If it's like circuit board copper clad it can be edge sanded quite easily. So, after getting it cut to size, you should be able to sand it to a nice, smooth edge.

                              Oh, another great way to cut garolite should be with a router equipped with a 1/8" or 1/4" carbide diamond pattern bit. That's what we used in the factory to profile the boards to final size. Be aware, the material is pretty abrasive; ordinary steel router bits won't last long. If you have a choice, go with the 1/4" bit; 1/8" bits have a tendency to snap.

                              I just found it available on AliExpress: https://www.aliexpress.com/item/4001...rch-mainSearch
                              Last edited by Ender5r; 04-03-2022, 05:48 PM.

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